Hymn: Christ the Saviour (87 87 D)

A hymn based on ‘Follow me: Living the sayings of Jesus

In Babilone 87 87 D

1

‘Take this bread’, said Christ the Saviour,

‘eat and share in life with me,

with thanksgiving bless and honour

all the gifts to set you free.’

May this cup of hope revive you

on your journey through this world

filled with grace to follow justly;

singing praise to Christ our Lord.

 

2

‘With this towel’, said Christ the Saviour,

‘I will wipe my people’s feet

washed in streams that flow from passion,

met at altar and in street.’

May the love that leads to service,

reaching out to all in need,

be a sign of Christ’s embracing;

singing praise to Christ our Lord.

 

3

‘When you come’, said Christ the Saviour,

‘to the altar with your gift,

check your heart for buried hatred,

lest it make too great a rift.’

As forgiveness makes us worthy,

as a treasure lost and found,

make our own an act of blessing;

singing praise to Christ our Lord.

 

4

‘See this coin’, said Christ the Saviour,

‘with the head that tells of power,

make it work for all God’s people

bringing hope to spring and flower.’

Use it wisely, use it justly

to achieve so much for good.

Bless the gift from God’s own bounty;

singing praise to Christ our Lord.

 

5

‘When you pray’, said Christ the Saviour,

‘use the words within your heart.

Ask for bread and for forgiveness,

seek the grace to play your part.’

Bow before the holy mountain

where God’s people have been led,

drinking from the living fountain;

singing praise to Christ our Lord.

 

6

‘See this cross’, said Christ the Saviour,

‘take it up and follow me

as so many have before you,

share its shame and victory.’

Walk in hope of Easter triumph,

when all things shall be redeemed,

in the love of Christ’s own promise;

singing praise to Christ our Lord.

 

Optional Doxology (2nd part of tune)

Alleluia to the Father,

Alleluia to the Son,

Alleluia, Holy Spirit;

Praising God, the Three in One.

 

© Ian Black 2019

 

Suggested tunes – with hymn numbers:

In Babilone (A&M 229; CP 168; HO&N 571)

Everton (A&M 781; AMNS 132; CP 573-i; NEH 498;)

Corvedale (A&M 806; CP 598-i;)

Lux Eoi (A&M 194; AMNS 80; CP 137; HO&N 9NEH 103;)

Blaenwern (A&M 721-ii; AMNS 464; CP 301; HO&N 428-ii; NEH 408-i;)

 

Key:

A&M – Ancient and Modern: Hymns and Songs for Refreshing Worship

AMR – Ancient and Modern New Standard

CP – Common Praise

HO&N – Complete Anglican Hymns Old & New (orange cover)

NEH – New English Hymnal

i or ii – First or Second Tune

 

This hymn is based on the themes in my book ‘Follow me: Living the Sayings of Jesus‘ (Sacristy Press 2017). It was written during my Sabbatical in the summer of 2019. It is offered for free use, with just the appropriate acknowledgement ‘© Ian Black 2019’.

It will go to any tune of the 87 87 D metre, but I think it needs to be one with energy and ‘In Babilone’ (above) suits it well. While this might not be well know, it is fairly easy to pick up so should prove quick to learn.

About Revd Canon Ian Black

Ian is Vicar of Peterborough, Canon Residentiary of Peterborough Cathedral and Rural Dean of Peterborough. He previously served for 10 years in Leeds, as Vicar of Whitkirk and as a member of the Chapter of Ripon Cathedral. He has also worked in Kent in Maidstone and as priest-in-charge of a group of parishes 10 miles north west of Canterbury. He was a Minor Canon of Canterbury Cathedral, a prison chaplain and Assistant Director of Post-Ordination Training for the Diocese of Canterbury. Prior to ordination Ian had a career in tax, both with the Inland Revenue as a PAYE Auditor and a firm of Chartered Accountants as a Tax Accountant. Ian is married with two sons. He is the author of three books of prayers: Prayers for all occasions (SPCK 2011), Intercessions for Years A, B & C (SPCK 2009) and Intercessions for the Calendar of Saints and Holy Days (SPCK 2005). His latest book is 'Follow me: living the sayings of Jesus' (Sacristy Press 2017). He has been writing online since the mid 1990s.
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